Over the past 29 years, the World Championship has become the definitive championship to decide the world's best woman golfer. Developed by the late founder of IMG, Mark McCormack, and the LPGA, the original format of the Championship featured the world's top 12 players. In 1995, Samsung became the title sponsor and has been an integral part of the development of the event. To reflect the growing number of outstanding women professionals from around the world, the Championship field in 1996 was increased to 16 players and in 1999, to 20 players. This year, the 29th Samsung World Championship will test the world's 20 best players.

2008 Ocean Course at Half Moon Bay Golf Links, Half Moon Bay, CA

Paula Creamer records eighth-career victory at the 2008 Samsung World Championship.


Tournament Highlights

Northern California native Paula Creamer carded a final-round 3-under-par 69 to win the Samsung World Championship at Half Moon Bay Golf Links. Creamer's four-day total of 9-under-par 279 (68-74-68-69) gave her a one-stroke victory over South Korean Song-Hee Kim (69-73-70-68=280, -8). The 22-year-old Creamer now has eight career LPGA Tour victories, including four in 2008 season the most for an American since Juli Inkster won five times in 1999.


"This (win) means a lot," said Creamer of her victory over the 20-player field. "I put so much pressure on myself every time I come here and to finally have one, it feels really good."


Creamer rolled in three birdie putts on the day, but her most important putt may have been a four-footer for par on the 72nd hole to avoid a playoff and clinch her first win in the San Francisco Bay Area. She carded her second-consecutive bogey-free day 37 consecutive bogey-free holes on Sunday to take home the $250,000 winner's check and increase her season earnings to $1,742,733 enough to take over second place on the 2008 LPGA Official Money List.


"Honestly, I didn't see it go in," Creamer said, referencing her final putt of the week. "All I heard was the people cheer for it, then it was like the longest two seconds of my life having it roll into the hole."